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Damn it Procrastination!

bisexualnatasharomanoff:

astrodidact:

via ScienceAlert
Titanium dioxide breaks down smog particles in the air, and students in the US have shown that in one year, one roof coated in it can break down the smog from a car that’s driven 17,000 km (10,500 miles). And every day, 21 tonnes of smog could be eliminated by one million treated roofs.
http://txchnologist.com/post/88500055810/students-show-common-compound-breaks-down-air-pollution

Kawai Tam, Chun-Yu “Jimmy” Liang, Jessica Moncayo, Edwin Rodriguez, Carlos Espinoza, Kelly McCoy, David Cocker and Louis Lancaster. From UC Riverside. Not just “Engineering students”.

bisexualnatasharomanoff:

astrodidact:

via ScienceAlert

Titanium dioxide breaks down smog particles in the air, and students in the US have shown that in one year, one roof coated in it can break down the smog from a car that’s driven 17,000 km (10,500 miles). And every day, 21 tonnes of smog could be eliminated by one million treated roofs.

http://txchnologist.com/post/88500055810/students-show-common-compound-breaks-down-air-pollution

Kawai Tam, Chun-Yu “Jimmy” Liang, Jessica Moncayo, Edwin Rodriguez, Carlos Espinoza, Kelly McCoy, David Cocker and Louis Lancaster. From UC Riverside. Not just “Engineering students”.

(via nobodyputstheimpalainacorner)

foxalpha:

falstafff:

i don’t understand why people don’t instantly respond to “what would your dream superpower be” with the ability to manipulate probability.
think about it. what’s the chance someone will drop 1mil in front of me? 0%? let’s make that 100%. what’s the probability i’ll wake up tomorrow and be X gender? 100%. what’s the probability my bathtub is filled with mac and cheese? 100%.

as a casino employee I can confirm this would be terrifying as fuck

(via nobodyputstheimpalainacorner)

How to Introduce a Setting

fictionwritingtips:

The important thing to remember is that you do not need to spend paragraphs in the beginning of your novel introducing your setting. Only give your readers what they need to know right away to understand the story, then you can gradually introduce the other aspects of your setting over time. Focus on where your character is, what is important about the setting at that moment, and how the setting either hinders or helps your character in that scene.

Remember that your setting also includes people and their ideologies. People interact with the setting of your story in a specific way and it should be explored. 

Here are a few ways to practice introducing your setting:

  • Pick a place you’re familiar with and write down details you think are important.
  • Imagine that you need to describe that setting to someone who has never seen it before. What would be important? What would be worth mentioning? Focus on these points.
  • Write a paragraph of that setting you would find in an advertisement. Why would people be interested in it? After that, write a negative review from someone who has visited that place. Why don’t they like it? What might be bad about that place?

Setting is not just about location, it’s about everything that can be experienced in your scene. What time is it? What’s the weather like? Is this place creepy? Is it warm and inviting? It helps to focus on the feel of a place, not just it’s physical location. 

Hope this helps!

(via blacksplash)

#FIRST MOMENT^2

fuckyeahcharacterdevelopment:

What was the first moment your OTP realized they are attracted to each other?

down-the-multifandom-hole said: How do you write a mentor character so that they're wise and intelligent but still humanly realistic in terms of flaws and weaknesses?

clevergirlhelps:

I’ve often found most character weaknesses come from the strengths the character already has. To that end, let’s look at strengths a mentor character usually has:

  • Wisdom. The mentor character is supposed to be wiser, if not smarter, than their student. Wisdom or intelligence comes with a number of flaws. The mentor could be arrogant in their intelligence or their wisdom could be difficult to understand. The mentor’s maturity could turn into patronization and condescension. 
  • Experience. Mentor characters have had time to go everywhere, do anything, and learn everything. They have experience, except now they’re older and they aren’t as sharp or flexible as they were in their golden years. The mentor could have the usual problems of an old person, and personality issues associated with those problems: self-hate because they aren’t at their best and jealousy because some people are at their best.
  • Pride. The mentor becomes a parent figure for their student. The mentor could take too much pride in their student and believe their student is invincible - and that’s dangerous for a number of reasons. The student might stop trusting their mentor, who puts them in dangerous situations.

Some other traits:

  • Short-tempered. I think it’s because most mentors tend to be older, but nearly all of them are irascible. You can make this into an anger issue or just something that causes friction between the mentor and others.
  • Reticent. Mentors like to keep things hidden until the plot demands it’s time for the protagonist to know. People/the student might not trust the mentor because they have so many secrets. 
  • Born in a different time/place. Again with the age, but mentors tend to come from places and eras different than where the protagonist comes from. The age/location gap could cause friction or the mentor could have some beliefs that translate into flaws when dealing with the protagonist.
  • Doubt. The student is inept at the beginning of their training. If their training progresses and they’re still inept, the mentor might feel doubt about their abilities to teach and/or their student’s ability to learn/become the Chosen One.

To shake things up, you might want to change the mentor’s past, disposition, or life. This will create more flaws and such. Here are some suggestions:

  • The mentor is the same or similar in age to their student (NO ROMANCE)
  • The mentor was never formally schooled in anything and sometimes makes things up to appear smart
  • The mentor has a family/other pressing responsibilities they’re juggling in addition to mentoring the hero
  • The mentor has multiple students
  • The Chosen One could be the mentor or their student, but no one knows yet - the mentor takes the student under their wing just in case the inexperienced student is The One
  • The mentor and the student really don’t get along and part ways a number of times

voicesofreasons said: Hey I wanted to know if you had any in depth or helpful information about writing a soulmate au?

clevergirlhelps:

Sure! I’ve actually had a lot of thoughts about soulmates recently, so this is a good opportunity. My basic feeling about soulmate stories is that they shouldn’t be as light, fluffy, and easy as they often are. The first reason is because conflict generates interest (which is why true utopias are so boring to read about) and the second reason is because life is hard. So here are some tips…

  • Do not stop their development as a couple. Their time together will change the nature of their relationship. Put the realization towards the beginning or middle of the story so you can explore how being together causes them to see the world differently.
  • Open the attachment to other forms of love. For example, squishes and friendship. Also make the attachment open to more than two individuals in the case of polyamory or a group of really close friends or something.
  • Let the couple have differences. It seems that a lot of soulmate couples just click within their first few dates and it’s all sunshine and rainbows from thereon out. You can still fight with someone and love them. You can have long-standing disagreements with someone (and not just those cutesy disagreements like who saw who first) and still love them. I know a couple that can’t stand each other during election season. After the election is over, they get back together like nothing happened. Even though they’re on different sides of the political spectrum, their love and mutual interests on other issues overcomes politics.
  • Don’t cure things with soulmates. Finding your soulmate should not cure things like addiction, self destructive behavior, or mental illness. It should not instantly iron out personality flaws. While a soulmate can be part of the healing process, they should not be the sole cause of their partner’s recovery.
  • Let people have relationships outside their soulmates. People don’t need to wait until they meet their soulmate to have meaningful relationships or do things you’re supposed to “save until marriage”. Even in a soulmate world, you should be able to go on dates with non-soulmates and have one night stands with other people. At the very least, I’m sure people want to figure out this dating nonsense before they try anything with their soulmate.
  • What about missing soulmates? Your soulmate could die young, fall in love with someone else, or seem utterly disappointing. Your soulmate could be a farmer in the American Midwest while you are a herder in rural Mongolia. Your soulmate could have been born in the 1800s. You could give up waiting for your soulmate and choose someone else who you are still really happy with.    
  • Finally. I’ve noticed that a lot of soulmate AU ideas on Tumblr involve your soulmate’s name somewhere on your body or a clock on your wrist counting down the minutes until you met them or some other clue as to when you will meet The One. Break that system.

How to Split Up Series Part 3 (The Prequel)

elumish:

The Prequel

This is a relatively uncommon form of series. In this case, the second book that comes out is chronologically before the first book. Usually, it doesn’t follow the same main character, and it may either follow a previous generation, a different setting, or both.

Usually a prequel tells a story that was referenced in the first book, either one that is talked about in regards to history or one that relates to a character that is soon in the first book. It is generally something that was important in the first book, and the prequel usually augments the first book, while standing alone as its own story.

One major thing to remember is that the first book should usually entirely stand alone. Readers shouldn’t need to know the details of the prequel to understand book one, because the prequel comes out after book one.

Another thing to remember about the prequel is that it needs to stay true to the description given in the first book. If you say that two armies fought each other, and now you’re telling about the two armies, make sure it’s the same two armies on the same two sides. Names, places, and ideas should stay the same.

The one caveat to that is if part of the point is that the details were wrong. If that is true, then the corrected details should add to the story. The account that you are seeing should be one that would give you the correct details, and there should be an important reason that everyone thought the details were one thing but your character knows that they’re not.

You need to make sure that there’s a reason for telling the story. Nobody wants to read the story of a random peasant 200 years ago, unless that random peasant does something important and/or is related somehow to characters who were important in your first books. Similarly, while you might be interested in every leader who ever ruled your fictional land, you don’t need to write a story about the king who ruled for thirty years, didn’t make any significant changes, and then died in his sleep.

I can’t really give a good outline for a prequel because it depends entirely on what you’re writing about, but the one thing that you need to remember, especially if the prequel is set relatively soon before the main story, is that the world can’t end in a totally different configuration than your new world starts. If it does that, it needs to be made really clear how it gets from that configuration to the one that your characters live in. 

(via blacksplash)

“Subplots bring realism to your main plot simply by existing – by interrupting the flow. Why is this? Because life doesn’t move forward all at once. Interruptions happen, change rushes in, we juggle three or ten balls at once. Readers don’t expect continuous narratives.”

—   Elizabeth Sims (via writingquotes)

(via blacksplash)

juliedillon:

Catalog of Merfolk Master Post
The entries to the Catalog of Merfolk art challenge were all so wonderful and creative! Everyone did a fantastic job, and it was so much fun seeing what everyone came up with. Thanks to everyone who participated! 
These are posted roughly in the order that I received them. In some cases, multiple entries are posted together; in others, they are spread apart (this was due to me just me not paying attention properly.) 
If you are still working on yours, I will still take submissions for the next few days (though I might be slow to add them). If you sent yours in and I accidentally overlooked it, please contact me again! 
Note: these are mermaids, so there are some bare bosoms about. 
EDIT: There were a few that weren’t displaying consistently in the tracked tags, so I’ve been going through adding them as I can find them. If yours is still missing, please let me know :) 
Read More

juliedillon:

Catalog of Merfolk Master Post

The entries to the Catalog of Merfolk art challenge were all so wonderful and creative! Everyone did a fantastic job, and it was so much fun seeing what everyone came up with. Thanks to everyone who participated! 

These are posted roughly in the order that I received them. In some cases, multiple entries are posted together; in others, they are spread apart (this was due to me just me not paying attention properly.) 

If you are still working on yours, I will still take submissions for the next few days (though I might be slow to add them). If you sent yours in and I accidentally overlooked it, please contact me again! 

Note: these are mermaids, so there are some bare bosoms about. 

EDIT: There were a few that weren’t displaying consistently in the tracked tags, so I’ve been going through adding them as I can find them. If yours is still missing, please let me know :) 

Read More

(via theredvipers)

Creating a Language Part III: Translations

thewritingcafe:

Creating a Language Part I

Creating a Language Part II: Essentials

Languages are not equal to one another in phonology, alphabets, syntax, grammar, or vocabulary. Languages within the same language family are more easily translatable because they are closely related, but the translation is always altered to make sense in the language it is translated to.

When you create your language, it does not have to be exactly like your native language. Different cultures have different concepts of time, of self, and of actions and have different tenses, pronouns, and verbs because of this.

Let’s create a word as a demonstration. This fictional word will be audimac (pronunciation (for this particular language): ow-djyih-mahk). This word is a verb that does not translate directly to English. It can be used to mean becoming, getting, growing, going, turning, and similar (present participle) verbs within the following contexts:

  • They are becoming angry.
  • I am getting cold.
  • It is growing old.
  • The food is going bad.
  • The water is turning green.

When translating all of these sentences into a our fictional language, “audimac” can be used for all of these sentences and it will make sense to the native speakers given the context.

By doing something like this, you are not only creating a more realistic language and putting more thought into the creation of your world, but you’re also making it a bit easier for yourself. Instead of having to come up with five different verbs, you only have to create one.

(via blacksplash)