Flag Counter Damn it Procrastination!

Damn it Procrastination!

kate-wisehart:

teaonatrain:

mizjtoz:

a—j—d:

neongenesisevangaylion:

I thought this would just be a simple article about meditation or relaxation which uses disappearance as a metaphor but it turns out this is the heaviest, realest wikihow of them all

omg.

Reblogging for later because you just never know.

This is really good character reference


JFC that was intense. O.o

5 Common Story Problems with Simple Fixes

fictionwritingtips:

Our stories are often plagued with these common story problems, but if we don’t know how to fix them, we’ll never improve our writing. It’s important that you remember you don’t need to scrap your novel if you keep having the same issues over and over again. Hopefully this list will help you pinpoint what’s going on and provide ways for you to improve your novel.

Problem: Unmotivated Characters

If you’re having trouble figuring out where your story should go next, the problem could be with unmotivated characters. Characters aren’t in your novel just so you can push them around every once in a while and make them do things. They need to develop over time and keep your story going in the right direction.

Solution:

Work on your character’s wants, goals, and motivations. You need to figure out what’s driving your character if you want them to do anything. Where do they want to end up? What’s standing in their way? What’s their plan? Who will help them? Think about everything your character will need to do to resolve your novel. Focus on what they want and what motivates their actions and your characters will stop being dull and lifeless.

Problem: Boring First Chapters

A boring first chapter is dangerous because you want to captivate your audience right away. You don’t want to lose readers just because of this, but sometimes it happens.  You should give enough information to keep your readers interested, while also keeping them intrigued enough to figure out what happens next.

Solution:

Putting emotion into your scenes from the beginning will not only help set the tone, but we’ll get an immediate understanding of your world. The best advice I can give is to construct a scene that helps us best understand your character. If they’re on the run, show us that they’re being chased. If they’re sad and lonely, construct a scene that lets us feel their isolation. You don’t necessarily need to open your book with action, but you do need to introduce the conflict. Think about what your character wants and go from there. Think of your first chapter as an introduction to an essay. You don’t go right into the points immediately, but you set us up for something good.

Problem: Plot Holes

Writers worry about forgetting to include important information in their novel that’s necessary to the plot. If you’re discovering that readers often point out plot holes in your story, maybe it’s time to reevaluate how you plan your novel.

Solution:

Pre-planning or prewriting your novel often solves any plot hole problems. If you take the time to write out important scenes so you don’t forget them, your story will become stronger. However, if you’re not someone who likes to do so much planning, you can tackle plot holes during the editing phase. Take notes when you’re editing so that you can catch these plot holes and figure out where you can add necessary information. A plot hole does not always mean your novel needs loads of reworking, but it is something you need to take the time to fill in.

Problem: Poor Pacing

Poor pacing can ruin a novel, but luckily it’s something you can tackle head on before you even start writing your story. Good pacing helps add tension to your novel and helps you make sure there’s enough rising and falling action to keep your story interesting.

Solution:

Planning out your novel ahead of time also helps solve pacing problems. You can create a timeline that helps you keep track and plan out when you want certain things to happen. Read up on story arcs and try to plan out your scenes accordingly. If you’re already done with your novel and you notice poor pacing, try rearranging scenes or spreading out the action.

Problem: Info-Dumping

A very common writing problem is info-dumping. This is when you tell your readers loads of information at a time without showing them anything important. Info-dumps usually occur in first chapters of novels, but they can happen anytime during the course of your story. Info- dumps can drag down your story and bore your readers.

Solution:

Cut out long paragraphs where you explain what’s going on in your novel and show your readers instead. Avoid over explaining things that can be explained through action. Letting your audience figure things out instead is a much more satisfying reading experience and it lets your readers connect with your characters on a deeper level.

-Kris Noel

(via thewritingcafe)

artofthedarkages:

A Byzantine solidus with portraits of the emperor Heraclius and his son as co-consuls.

Cast out of gold.

Made in the early 7th century in the Eastern Mediterranean. Currently held at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

(via northernbriton)

hedendom:

Galdrakver (‘Little Book Of Magic’)

The ‘Little Book Of Magic’ is a seventeenth-century Icelandic manuscript, written on animal skin and containing magical staves, sigils, prayers, charms and related texts.

It is known to have once been owned by Icelandic Bishop Hannes Finnson who was alive from 1739 until 1796 and known for having a vast library containing many volumes of magic related texts and manuscripts.

Full manuscript here.

(via northernbriton)

56 Victorian Slang Terms

nevver:

  1. Afternoonified
    A society word meaning “smart.” Forrester demonstrates the usage: “The goods are not ‘afternoonified’ enough for me.”
  2. Arfarfan’arf
    A figure of speech used to describe drunken men. “He’s very arf’arf’an’arf,” Forrester writes, “meaning he has had many ‘arfs,’” or half-pints of booze.
  3. Back slang it
    Thieves used this term to indicate that they wanted “to go out the back way.”
  4. Bags o’ Mystery
    An 1850 term for sausages, “because no man but the maker knows what is in them. … The ‘bag’ refers to the gut which contained the chopped meat.”
  5. Bang up to the elephant
    This phrase originated in London in 1882, and means “perfect, complete, unapproachable.”
  6. Batty-fang
    Low London phrase meaning “to thrash thoroughly,” possibly from the French battre a fin.
  7. Benjo
    Nineteenth century sailor slang for “A riotous holiday, a noisy day in the streets.”
  8. Bow wow mutton
    A naval term referring to meat so bad “it might be dog flesh.”
  9. Bricky
    Brave or fearless. “Adroit after the manner of a brick,” Forrester writes, “said even of the other sex, ‘What a bricky girl she is.’”
  10. Bubble Around
    A verbal attack, generally made via the press. Forrester cites The Golden Butterfly: “I will back a first-class British subject for bubbling around against all humanity.”
  11. Butter Upon Bacon
    Extravagance. Too much extravagance. “Are you going to put lace over the feather, isn’t that rather butter upon bacon?”
  12. Cat-lap
    A London society term for tea and coffee “used scornfully by drinkers of beer and strong waters … in club-life is one of the more ignominious names given to champagne by men who prefer stronger liquors.”
  13. Church-bell
    A talkative woman.
  14. Chuckaboo
    A nickname given to a close friend.
  15. Collie shangles
    Quarrels. A term from Queen Victoria’s journal, More Leaves , published in 1884: “At five minutes to eleven rode off with Beatrice, good Sharp going with us, and having occasional collie shangles (a Scotch word for quarrels or rows, but taken from fights between dogs) with collies when we came near cottages.”
  16. Cop a Mouse
    To get a black eye. “Cop in this sense is to catch or suffer,” Forrester writers, “while the colour of the obligation at its worst suggests the colour and size of the innocent animal named.”
  17. Daddles
    A delightful way to refer to your rather boring hands.
  18. Damfino
    This creative cuss is a contraction of “damned if I know.”
  19. Dizzy Age
    A phrase meaning “elderly,” because it “makes the spectator giddy to think of the victim’s years.” The term is usually refers to “a maiden or other woman canvassed by other maiden ladies or others.”
  20. Doing the Bear
    “Courting that involves hugging.”
  21. Don’t sell me a dog
    Popular until 1870, this phrase meant “Don’t lie to me!” Apparently, people who sold dogs back in the day were prone to trying to pass off mutts as purebreds.
  22. Door-knocker
    A type of beard “formed by the cheeks and chin being shaved leaving a chain of hair under the chin, and upon each side of mouth forming with moustache something like a door-knocker.”
  23. Enthuzimuzzy
    “Satirical reference to enthusiasm.” Created by Braham the terror, whoever that is.
  24. Fifteen puzzle
    Not the game you might be familiar with, but a term meaning complete and absolute confusion.
  25. Fly rink
    An 1875 term for a polished bald head.
  26. Gal-sneaker
    An 1870 term for “a man devoted to seduction.”
  27. Gas-Pipes
    A term for especially tight pants.
  28. Gigglemug
    “An habitually smiling face.”
  29. Got the morbs
    Use of this 1880 phrase indicated temporary melancholy.
  30. Half-rats
    Partially intoxicated.
  31. Jammiest bits of jam
    “Absolutely perfect young females,” circa 1883.
  32. Kruger-spoof
    Lying, from 1896.
  33. Mad as Hops
    Excitable.
  34. Mafficking
    An excellent word that means getting rowdy in the streets.
  35. Make a stuffed bird laugh
    “Absolutely preposterous.”
  36. Meater
    A street term meaning coward.
  37. Mind the Grease
    When walking or otherwise getting around, you could ask people to let you pass, please. Or you could ask them to mind the grease, which meant the same thing to Victorians.
  38. Mutton Shunter
    This 1883 term for a policeman is so much better than “pig.”
  39. Nanty Narking
    A tavern term, popular from 1800 to 1840, that meant great fun.
  40. Nose bagger
    Someone who takes a day trip to the beach. He brings his own provisions and doesn’t contribute at all to the resort he’s visiting.
  41. Not up to Dick
    Not well.
  42. Orf chump
    No appetite.
  43. Parish Pick-Axe
    A prominent nose.
  44. Podsnappery
    This term, Forrester writers, describes a person with a “wilful determination to ignore the objectionable or inconvenient, at the same time assuming airs of superior virtue and noble resignation.”
  45. Poked Up
    Embarrassed.
  46. Powdering Hair
    An 18th century tavern term that means “getting drunk.”
  47. Rain Napper
    An umbrella.
  48. Sauce-box
    The mouth.
  49. Shake a flannin
    Why say you’re going to fight when you could say you’re going to shake a flannin instead?
  50. Shoot into the brown
    To fail. According to Forrester, “The phrase takes its rise from rifle practice, where the queer shot misses the black and white target altogether, and shoots into the brown i.e., the earth butt.”
  51. Skilamalink
    Secret, shady, doubtful.
  52. Smothering a Parrot
    Drinking a glass of absinthe neat; named for the green color of the booze.
  53. Suggestionize
    A legal term from 1889 meaning “to prompt.”
  54. Take the Egg
    To win.
  55. Umble-cum-stumble
    According to Forrester, this low class phrase means “thoroughly understood.”
  56. Whooperups
    A term meaning “inferior, noisy singers” that could be used liberally today during karaoke sessions.

(via skellerbzzt)

moniquill:

naamahdarling:

wrath-fire-ice:

Bury me in this.

*SCREAMS*

Get buried in this, get found by archeologists ten thousand years later, get presumed some kind of monarch or holy figure.

moniquill:

naamahdarling:

wrath-fire-ice:

Bury me in this.

*SCREAMS*

Get buried in this, get found by archeologists ten thousand years later, get presumed some kind of monarch or holy figure.

(via bemusedlybespectacled)

#480923839303

fuckyeahcharacterdevelopment:

Your character learns something that they’d rather not have known about their friend.

peashooter85:

An ornate 6 shot wheel-lock revolving musket decorated with gold, silver, ivory, and bone.  Originates from Russia, 16th century, possibly restored or added onto in the 18th or 19th century.

(Source: liveauctionworld.com, via gingerhaze)

Sneaky Plotting Problems: The Top 10 Countdown

bookgeekconfessions:

Tips by Alicia Rasley

Originally Posted on AliciaRasley.com

image

Problem #10: Backstory Blunders

The past is prologue, for sure, but you can tell too much too soon dragging your plot down, if everything about the characters’ past is explained right upfront in Chapter One.

Problem # 9: Boring Beginnings

If you have to rely on your readers’ patience while you get the story set up, you’re likely to lose most of them.

Start where the protagonist’s problem starts, or just before that, and feed in the backstory later. This is the MTV era– people don’t like to wait.

Be especially wary of books that start with the protagonist on a journey, thinking about what awaits her at the destination. Editors frequently mention that as an example of a boring opening. It helps to decide what your major story questions are and make sure those are posed in the first few chapters– at least one should be posed in Chapter One.

Problem #8: Limping to a Conclusion

You don’t want the reader to think you ended the book just because you ran out of paper. Make the ending a conclusive one, reinforcing the themes of the book and the progress of the protagonist. (Click here for more discussion of this topic.)

Problem # 7: Sagging Middle

The middle has to do more than just fill up the space between beginning and end. It should be a time of “rising conflict” where the protagonist is tested up to (and perhaps beyond) the limits of his ability– a time to develop the internal and external conflicts and show how they influence the protagonist’s actions. It should set up the great crisis/climax/resolution that will bring the novel to a close.

So when you’re starting the middle, think of how the protagonist can be challenged. What external plot events can make his internal conflict impossible to ignore any longer? How can that internal conflict impede his/her progress towards the goal? If there’s an antagonist, how does the antagonist’s reaction affect the protagonist’s progress?

Read More

(via its-a-writer-thing)

Eight Tips to Bring Your Setting to Life

writersfriend:

by Anne Marble

Description is something that gets in the way of many authors. Why? Well, because it’s so darn hard to write. And no wonder. If you’re not careful, descriptive sequences can become static, even dull. Writing action and dialogue is so much more fun. On top of that, description incorporates so many elements. It doesn’t just cover describing the setting — it also involves descriptions of the characters’ clothes and appearance, the “props” your characters use, the weather, and so forth.

If you’re not very accomplished at writing description, then sometimes you might want to avoid writing it. But then, you can wind up with stories where people wander vague hallways or buildings, and readers don’t get a sense of time or place from your story. A story without enough description is missing something. People who read a story that’s lacking in description might ask “Where does this take place? Are there buildings around them?” I must admit that often happens when people look at my early drafts.

At the same time, some writers err in the other direction, including too much description. They fall in love with their setting and can’t help tell the readers about it. And tell and tell. This can impede the flow of the narrative. Imagine readers skimming your book in the store. If they see pages and pages describing the castle grounds, or the chic hotel, they will probably put it down and pick up someone else’s book instead.

How bad is bad description? Think of bad description as being like that teacher who droned on and on and put the class to sleep. Good description is more like the teacher who got students involved by using anecdotes and making the class interactive. You don’t want the descriptive passages in your story to put your readers to sleep, do you?

Read More

(via writersyoga)